Middle East UN concerned over Iran juvenile executions

UN concerned over Iran juvenile executions
UN Special Rapporteur urges the Government to immediately and unconditionally prohibit the sentencing of children to death and to engage in a comprehensive process of commutation of all death sentences handed down on persons currently on death row for crimes committed under the age of 18. (Photo: Archive)

GENEVA, Switzerland (Kurdistan24) – The UN Special Rapporteur on Monday reported on the dire situation of human rights in Iran and condemned the alarming rates of juvenile executions in the country.

Asma Jahangir, the UN Special Rapporteur-designate for Human Rights in Iran, released her advanced remarks on the violation of rights in Iran.

She urged Iran to “immediately and unconditionally prohibit the sentencing of children to death and to engage in a comprehensive process of commutation of all death sentences handed down on persons currently on death row for crimes committed under the age of 18.”

The Special Rapporteur also reiterated calls made by her predecessor to “establish a moratorium on the use of the death penalty.”

Additionally, Jahangir urged the Government “to replace the death penalty for drug-related offences by penalties which comply with relevant international standards.”

She also emphasized the Government should put an end to public executions.

A majority of those hanged in previous years were charged with drug distribution.

However, many officials believe capital punishment did not reduce drug use in the country.

The rate of drug addiction in Iran has been on the rise despite the fatal penalty for drug users and distributors.

In a conference in Ahwaz last year, the Director of Research and Education at the headquarters of the Drug Enforcement Iran Hamid Sarami said Iran had approximately 1.3 million registered drug addicts.

The number does not include occasional users and unregistered addicts.

Of these addicts, 58 percent were reportedly younger than 34, nine percent were women, and 22 percent received higher education. 

Sarami also outlined drug addiction had killed an average of seven people per day over the past two decades.

Amnesty International (AI) said the continuation of capital punishment “demonstrates the Iranian authorities’ utter disregard for the right to life.”

According to AI, drug offenses do not meet the threshold of “most serious crimes…for which the death penalty is permitted under international human rights law."

Said Boumedouha, Amnesty’s Middle East and North Africa Deputy Director, called Iran’s treatment of prisoners “appalling.” 

In August 2016, 22 international human rights organizations condemned Iran’s execution of Kurdish political prisoners and prisoners of conscience.

They urged the European Union (EU) to call on Iran to impose a moratorium on the death penalty in light of its upcoming human rights dialogue.

“The EU should insist that as a sign of good will Iranian authorities should cease all executions at minimum for the duration of the dialogue,” the rights group said.

“We also urge the EU to insist on the right to fair trials in all cases,” AI continued.

 

Editing by Karzan Sulaivany

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    Cleohaliqiouis@gmail.com Wednesday, 15 March 2017
  • How is this possible? How are children being killed for mistakes they made? I think this method should be applied to the so called religious government. How many of their children have committed crimes of this nature? How many of their children have suffered this fate?