COVID-19: Kurdistan Region records over 490 cases, 17 fatalities in 24 hours

Officials from the autonomous Kurdistan Region announced on Sunday that government health workers had recorded over 490 new coronavirus cases over the past day, raising total infections there so far to more than 93,000 since the start of the pandemic in early March.
author_image Halgurd Sherwani

ERBIL (Kurdistan 24) – Officials from the autonomous Kurdistan Region announced on Sunday that health workers had recorded over 490 new coronavirus cases over the past day, raising total infections there so far to more than 93,000 since the start of the pandemic in early March.

In their daily coronavirus update, officials from the regional health ministry announced 495 new infections over the previous 24 hours out of over 6,505 tests completed in that period.

Adding the new figures, the Kurdistan Region has seen 93,433 cases since the advent of the pandemic in early March.

Officials have blamed a recent spike in the number of patients, at times over 1,000 new daily cases, primarily on the public’s failure to follow health measures enacted to stem the spread of the disease.

Health officials announced this week that over 31,000 COVID-19 patients are currently being treated for the disease in hospitals and clinics throughout the Kurdistan Region.

Read MoreCOVID-19: Kurdistan Region has over 31,000 patients under treatment

The health ministry says that over 57,000 people have recovered from the coronavirus, but it is important to note that a “recovery” classification only indicates that a patient is no longer being actively treated by health professionals—not that they have fully recovered from the disease.

Increasingly, medical experts recognize that COVID-19 symptoms, some of them quite serious, often continue long after an individual’s formal recovery and that various other effects, such as significant lung damage, could be permanent. 

The coronavirus has infected more than 57 million people worldwide and killed almost 1.4 million, according to Johns Hopkins University’s database. The actual figures could be dramatically higher due to insufficient testing capabilities or underreporting. 

Editing by Khrush Najari