Baghdad to confiscate assets, property of Saddam Hussein affiliates

The Commission for Accountability and Justice in Iraq, part of the De-Baathificatoin process in the country, released a list containing thousands of names whose property and assets remain symbols of the former regime and ordered their seizure.
author_image Nadia Riva

ERBIL, Kurdistan Region (Kurdistan 24) – The Commission for Accountability and Justice in Iraq, part of the De-Baathification process in the country, released a list containing thousands of names whose property and assets remain symbols of the former regime and ordered their seizure.

In a statement issued on Sunday, the agency called on the Iraqi government to confiscate and seize the financial assets and property of over 4,200 former ministers and officials of the Baath party, whether dead or alive, and that might be in the hands of their close relatives.

Saddam's name appeared at the top of the list, and it also said it included "his children, grandchildren, relatives."

Among the names released are the Iraqi dictator’s cousin, Ali Hassan al-Majid, also known as “Chemical Ali” for his genocidal chemical bombing campaign on the Kurds in Iraq, and his half-brother, Barzan Ibrahim al-Hassan al-Tikriti, as well as former Vice President Taha Yassin Ramadan.

Also included in the list is Saddam’s special secretary, Abdul Hamid Mahmoud, known as Abdul Hamoud, and Tareq Aziz, who died in 2015 in jail after surrendering to US forces in 2003.

Aziz’s son, Ziad, accused Baghdad’s decision of being nothing more than a “political stunt” designed to win votes in the upcoming May 12 elections.

“We've been subjected to pressure and injustice for 15 years, it's enough,” he told AFP. “When will the spite of this so-called government end?”

Ziad Aziz denied his family still possessed any assets from his father’s time under Saddam, saying prominent Shia politician Ammar al-Hakim had already seized the latter's house in Baghdad.

After the fall of the Saddam regime in 2003, property belonging to the former ruler and his Baath party members were divided among Iraq's new leaders, armed forces, and multiple militias.

The seizure of assets extends to real estate, cars, bank accounts, and other funds.

The Accountability and Justice Commission on its website published two lists, one including the names of 52 people whose money was confiscated. The second list has 4,257 names, those who worked for the banned Baath party and its security service.