British Lord praises respect of ethnic, religious minorities in Kurdistan

The Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) places great importance on the rights of ethnic and religious groups in the Kurdistan Region, a top Kurdish official told a British envoy on Saturday.
author_image Sangar Ali

ERBIL, Kurdistan Region (Kurdistan 24) – The Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) places great importance on the rights of ethnic and religious groups in the Kurdistan Region, a top Kurdish official told a British envoy on Saturday.

“The KRG takes great care in protecting the rights of all ethnic and religious groups in the Kurdistan Region. It is at the top of the KRG’s agenda, and we will continue our effort in that respect,” said Prime Minister of the Kurdistan Region Nechirvan Barzani.

Barzani’s statement was given during a meeting in Erbil with British delegates led by Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon, the Prime Minister’s Special Representative on Preventing Sexual Violence in Conflict, and Minister of State for the Commonwealth and the United Nations.

Ahmad shared the UK’s support for the Kurdistan Region in protecting the rights of all communities, namely in areas affected by conflict. He also praised the KRG’s efforts in this regard, according to the KRG’s press office.

Both sides discussed the recent situation in Iraq and the uptick in violence and insecurity, as well as the means to combat it. Barzani highlighted the need to educate the community on resolving issues without violent confrontation.

The fight against terrorism and affairs related to refugees and Internally Displaced Persons’ (IDPs) were also topics of conversation between the officials.

Over the past three years, the Kurdistan Region has been a safe haven for 1.8 million refugees and IDPs, who fled from Syria and other parts of Iraq due to the threat of Islamic State (IS) attacks.

There are various ethnic and religious groups in the Kurdistan Region, including Kurds, Turkmen, Arabs, Muslim, and Christians. The KRGs Ministry of Endowment and Religious Affairs additionally includes representatives from the Muslim, Christian, Jewish, Ezidi (Yezidi), Zoroastrian, Kakai (Yarsan), Baha’i, Sabaean, and Mandaean communities.

Editing by Nadia Riva