Turkey shells Syria's Kurdish city of Qamishlo

On Thursday, seven civilians were wounded when a rocket coming from Turkey’s city of Nusaybin hit a stadium in Syria’s predominantly-Kurdish northeastern city of Qamishlo.

QAMISHLO, Syrian Kurdistan (Kurdistan24) – On Thursday, seven civilians were wounded when a rocket coming from Turkey’s city of Nusaybin hit a stadium in Syria’s Kurdish city of Qamishlo.

Kurdistan24 correspondent in Qamishlo reported that the rocket fell on the stadium during a football match and wounded seven civilians, including a child and two players.

The rocket hit at around 16:30, destroying part of the building, and creating panic among the residents of the city.

The wounded were immediately transferred to Al-Rahma Hospital in Qamishlo.

A doctor in Al-Rahma Hospital told Kurdistan24 that one child was severely injured and one of the adults was in a critical condition.  

The Turkish army has already shelled the northern outskirts of Qamishlo many times in the past few months, but this is the first time that a rocket explodes inside the city.

This is not the first time Turkey is bombing Qamishlo.

Baraa Sabri, a Syrian Kurdish journalist, told Kurdistan24 on Friday that the bizarre Turkish mentality is blindly hostile to Kurds.

“Anytime Turkey is attacked by any forces, they revenge by an offence against Kurds,” he said.

“Whenever terrorists infiltrate into Turkey from the predominantly-Arabic areas north of Aleppo, Turkish government constructs walls along its borders with the Kurdish northeastern areas. But Kurds are fighting terrorism and their borders are safe,” Sabri said.

Likewise, Sabri explained that when the terrorists in the IS-held areas shell the Turkish territories (Kilis, for example), the Turkish army responds by shelling or assaulting the Kurdish areas (Qamishlo or Afrin for instance).

Qamishlo, in Hasakeh Province, is under the shared control of the Syrian regime and Kurdish Democratic Union Party (PYD) and its military wing of People's Protection Units (YPG), who have declared zones of "autonomous administration" across parts of north and northeast Syria.

The YPG and PYD have often been accused by their rivals of supporting the Assad regime, although they have engaged in clashes with Syrian security forces several times since the outbreak of the Syrian civil war in 2011.

 

Reporting by Hisham Arafat

Editing by Ava Homa