BBC Farsi anchor sparks outrage among Iranians

Angry Iranians took to social media to condemn the BBC Farsi TV anchor for "losing sight of professionalism" while interviewing a member of Kurdish opposition.

LOS ANGELES, United States (Kurdistan24) - Angry Iranians took to social media to condemn the BBC Farsi TV anchor for "losing sight of professionalism" while interviewing a member of Kurdish opposition.

Farnaz Ghazizadeh, BBC Persian Television Presenter, interviewed Shaho Hoseini, the representative of the Kurdistan Democratic Party of Iran (PDKI) to Paris and asked him if Iran's claim about Saudi supporting Kurdish opposition is correct.

Iran and PDKI clashed this year after a three-decade ceasefire and Iran has been accusing Saudi Arabi of sponsoring the Kurdish opposition. PDKI vehemently denies the allegation.

The BBC video titled "What is a PDKI member doing in this year's Hajj?" (the Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca), has sparked heated debates since many believe the very title is unprofessional.

If your party is secular democratic, why is one of your members in pilgrimage, Ghazizade asked Hoseini.

Ahmad Rafat, a UK-based Iranian-Italian journalist with over four decades of experience, told Kurdistan24 that the anchor, "In addition to keeping a partial tone and proving her lack of knowledge about how the political party functions, didn't even know the difference between secularism (separation of religion and state) and atheism (disbelief in God)."

The BBC anchor is also criticized for "taking side and having the 'guilty unless proven innocent' approach" while asking her guest if Saudi Arabi supports PDKI.

Facebook user Sasan Amjadi claims this approach to asking questions is turning "the interview into an interrogation."

Arash Saleh, representative of the PDKI to the U.S.A told Kurdistan24, "This anchor is clearly a product of the Islamic Republic of Iran and has internalized the hatred and phobia of ethnic and religious minorities that the regime spreads in the society," 

"The political power in Iran has always accepted and legalized only one way of life and one form of culture. That is why even among intellectuals, journalists, and even the opposition, there are many who are trying to criminalize and marginalize the demands of Kurds," Saleh added.

Saleh believes this approach is meant to dismiss the demands of the Kurds by accusing them of being puppets of Saudi Arabia or the United States or Israel.

"Exactly the same strategy that the Islamic Republic of Iran has been following for more than three decades. They are trying to erase the [Kurdish] question because their hatred and phobia do not allow them to find a solution for it," Saleh concluded.