KDP files legal complaints on provincial election results

In a statement on Friday, the KDP spokesperson said his party has faced “numerous obstacles”, including security and political pressures.
The official emblem of KDP. (Photo: Combined by Kurdistan24)
The official emblem of KDP. (Photo: Combined by Kurdistan24)

ERBIL (Kurdistan24) – The Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) is set to file a legal complaint officially in Baghdad on Saturday on the latest Iraqi provincial election results, a party official told Kurdistan24.

The leading Kurdish party which has secured six seats – four at Nineveh Provincial Council and two at Kirkuk Provincial Council – argues the final results that were announced by the Iraqi Independent High Electoral Commission do not reflect the party’s standing.

“We believe the number of our votes is much higher than what has been announced,” Hawar Mohammed, the spokesperson for the KDP election department, told Kurdistan24, adding the party has concerns regarding the results at both Kirkuk and Nineveh provinces.

In a statement on Friday, the KDP spokesperson said his party has faced “numerous obstacles”, including security and political pressures.

Despite the concerns, the party is willing to engage in negotiations based on “partnership” with the Iraqi and Kurdish parties to form local governments, the party spokesperson said.

The KDP was able to reopen its headquarters in Kirkuk following years of forced closure by the Iraqi security forces, imposing an unofficial ban on the party’s activities in the oil-rich province following the 2017 independence referendum.

Members of the parties complained during the election rallies that they were harassed on numerous occasions.

In a decade, Iraq was able to hold a new provincial election across 15 Iraqi provinces on Dec. 18.

The election turnout stood at 41 percent, a decrease from the 2013 provincial election turnout of 50 percent.

The low turnout partially contributed to the boycott of the elections by several Iraqi parties, including the Sadrists. Moqtada Al-Sadr, the Shiite firebrand, extended his gratitude to the boycotters.

The low turnout partially contributed to the boycott of the elections by several Iraqi parties, including the Sadrists. Moqtada Al-Sadr, the Shiite firebrand, extended his gratitude to the boycotters.

The United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) does not monitor the elections, as the Iraqi government did not request the UN to supervise the polls.